WAVE Triannual Meeting, Tuesday, October 17, 2017

Bob Craycraft, SW Waterfront Village, welcomed everyone and introduced Reverend Martha Clark, Rector, St. Augustine’s Episcopal Church, who also welcomed everyone to their facility. 

Miriam Kelty, Co-Chair of WAVE representing Maryland Villages, also welcomed attendees, explaining the new schedule of WAVE membership meeting three times per year – Triannual Meetings. 

The IT Committee offered in their report that they are still working after four years on studying village software packages that offer the best value to villages. Having studied many existing packages and not able to find developers willing to develop packages without a guaranteed return, the IT Committee has decided that they will serve in a “Consumer Reports” function to evaluate software packages for villages, in hopes that their reviews will lead to improvements and affordability.  The Committee also announced that Dave Prescott has taken over the duties of managing WAVE’s website.

The Treasurer’s Report stated that WAVE had collected $420.00 in revenue, spent $588.00 in expenses, had $5,102.00 in carryover, for a balance of $4,934.00.  All villages were reminded of the importance of paying village dues of $35.00 per year so that WAVE can prevent using up our reserves.

Secretary’s Report – The minutes from the June 2017 Triannual meeting were accepted as written and posted for review.

Announcements:

  • Iona Senior Services announced an upcoming Practice and Ethics Committee discussion about ethical village issues.
  • Home Care Assistance, serving DC and Montgomery County, MD soon, was introduced as the sponsor for the refreshments of this Triannual Meeting.
  • Sharon Canner, Neighbors Helping Neighbors (N2N) in Reston, VA announced that there would be a Virginia Village Day in February 2018.

Guest Speaker:

Becky Theriot, founder and owner of A First Class Move (AFCM) was introduced to speak about Disorganized Homes and Hoarding.  She stated that her business was targetted to individuals whose homes were “bursting at the seams” with clutter, which can cause safety risks that can lead to health issues.  Among her more pointed remarks: hoarding is a disorder that can be treated but not cured; health, social and mental health and safety can all be compromised; not only is it important to clear up a physical space, but also it helps the individual; recognize the problem, consult professionals or authorities, and give the individual a say in how to remedy the situation; clutter requires organizing one’s space; the key is to make the solution as stress free as possible.

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